Literary Arts

MFA Students

  • Helen Armstrong

    Helen Armstrong is a queer writer who accidentally washed up on the shore in Providence, Rhode Island. Her work can be found in Black Warrior Review, Jellyfish Review, and more. She spends her time exploring gender and queerness in language and the possibilities that words create for communities.

  • photo of Allison Arteaga Argumedo

    Allison Arteaga Argumedo

    Allison Arteaga Argumedo, born in Peru during the end of the internal conflict, writes, photographs and sequences histories of national amnesia, provincial life, and American self-mutilation. Allison recently graduated from Cornell University and is an MFA candidate in the cross-disciplinary track.

  • Tessa Bolsover

    Tessa Bolsover

    Tessa Bolsover is a poet based between Providence, RI and Queens, NY. Her work has appeared in The Brooklyn Rail, No, Dear Magazine, DIAGRAM, and elsewhere. She is a founding editor of auric press.

  • Si-Min Chong

    Si-Min Chong

    Si-Min Chong grew up in the industrial west of Singapore, where the air smells of cacao. She writes about vessels: women, trees, and snakes.

  • Jay Gao

    Jay Gao

    Jay Gao is the author of Imperium (2022), forthcoming from Carcanet Press. He is studying for an MFA in poetry at Brown University. He is also the author of three poetry pamphlets: TRAVESTY58, forthcoming from SPAM Press; Katabasis (2020), a winner of a New Poets Prize; and Wedding Beasts (2019), shortlisted for the Saltire-Calum MacDonald Award. He is a Contributing Editor at The White Review and is a mentor for the Ledbury Emerging Poetry Critics Programme. In 2022, he will be a Tin House Winter Resident. He lives in Edinburgh (Scotland) and Providence (Rhode Island).

  • Keith Gopie

  • Adjua Gargi Nzinga Greaves

    Adjua Gargi Nzinga Greaves

    Adjua Gargi Nzinga Greaves (1980, New York City) writes ethnobotanical literary criticism, and collages detritus into heraldic devices engaging ever expanding networks of reference through the granular analytics of poetic inquiry. Her work has been published, anthologized, exhibited, and reviewed by About Place Journal, The Recluse, Belladonna*, Kore Press, Pinsapo Journal, The Brooklyn Rail, Ugly Duckling Presse, Artists Space, Issue Project Room, Hyperallergic, and 4 Columns. Formerly a Monday Night Reading Series curator at The Poetry Project, site director for Wendy's Subway, and an artist-in-residence at Rauschenberg Residency, Greaves is currently based in Providence, Rhode Island where she is Young Mother of The Florxal Review and a candidate for the MFA in Poetry from the Literary Arts Program at Brown University.

  • Hyo Jin Ha

    Hyo Jin Ha

    Hyo Jin Ha is a writer from Seoul, South Korea. She writes autofiction on the emergence of memories and distorted time. She received her BA in Writing Seminars and Film & Media Studies at Johns Hopkins and is now an MFA candidate in Fiction at Brown University. 

  • Jordan Jace

  • Saniya Kamal

    Saniya Kamal

    Saniya Kamal is a writer from Karachi. Currently her work is populated by imposters with a complicated relationship to belonging. On days when the sky is generous she likes to record time lapses of clouds.

  • Brian Kearney

  • Catherine Kim

    Catherine Kim

    Catherine Kim is a Canadian writer originally from South Korea. She received a BA from Harvard, where she concentrated in Studies of Women, Gender, and Sexuality. Her short stories have appeared in Nat.Brut, the Nameless Woman anthology, the Transcendent series, and elsewhere; her writing was shortlisted for the Sunburst Award in 2020.

  • Sophia McLain

    Sophia McLain

    Sophia McLain is a writer, letterpress printmaker, and quilter. Her work has appeared in Tendon and been exhibited at Jack Straw Cultural Center. After earning her BA from The Evergreen State College, she taught poetry in juvenile detention. She was raised by the Salish Sea and now lives in Providence, where she is a Literary Arts MFA candidate in fiction at Brown University.

  • George Christopher Moreno

    George Christopher Moreno

    George Christopher Moreno is a Chicanx short story writer, essayist, and playwright. A former amateur professional skateboarder born in California, he received his BA from the University of New Mexico, where he concentrated in creative writing, theatre, and performance studies. He now lives in Providence, Rhode Island. His work has appeared in Blue Mesa Review, Conceptions Southwest, Two Hawks Quarterly, Two-Way Street, Poets’ Picnic, and the New Mexico Humanities Council. His theatrical work has been called “beautifully moody…elegiac…Beckettian,” by the Los Angeles Times. He’s currently an MFA candidate in fiction at Brown University.

  • Nome Emeka Patrick

    Nome Emeka Patrick

    Nome Emeka Patrick is a Nigerian poet. His work has been published or is forthcoming in POETRY, Narrative, AGNI, TriQuarterly, West Branch, Waxwing, Hayden’s ferry Review, Poet Lore, Beloit Poetry Journal, Black Warrior Review and elsewhere. A Best of the Net, Best New Poets, and Pushcart prize nominee. He emerged third place in the Frontier Poetry Award for New Poets, 2020. His manuscript We Need New Moses. Or New Luther King was a finalist for the 2019 Sillerman First Book Prize for African Poets. He writes from Providence, RI where he is currently an MFA candidate in Poetry at Brown University.

  • Rachelle Rahmé

    Rachelle Rahmé

    Born in Jounieh, Lebanon, Rachelle Rahmé is a Lebanese-American poet, translator and scholar interested in liberatory methodologies. She is passionate about philosophy, sound, cinema, avant-garde histories, freedom and equality, and aims to foster these through critical thought, writing, and collaborative liberation projects. Rahmé is the author of Count Thereof Upon the Other’s Limbs (72 Press, 2019) and the chapbooks Puce Commodity (earthbound, 2020), Bataille’s Eggs (blush, 2021), 27 Poems on Death (o•blēk, 2021), translations of the poetry of Georges Bataille. Rahmé was a 2021-2022 ESB Fellow at the Poetry Project (NYC). Her poems and translations have appeared or are forthcoming in fieldnotesFonograf3foldNo No Nothe tinyThe RecluseF Mag and The Brooklyn Rail, among others. Her interdisciplinary work and collaborations have been presented by Issue Project Room, The Kitchen, The Stone, Roulette, and PS1, among others. Rahmé holds a Masters in Philosophy from the New School for Social Research.

  • Riley Ratcliff

    Riley Ratcliff

    Riley Ratcliff (they/she) is an amateur diarist from San Antonio, Texas. Their poetry however can be found now and soon in journals such as: APARTMENT PoetryAnnuletDIAGRAMFENCEPoetry NorthwestTwo Peach, and TYPO, among others. Recurrent interests include: lifestyle poetics, writing as a friendship practice, prefigurative logic, atavistic turns of phrase, distortion, fruit-ekphrasis.

  • Alison C. Rollins

    Alison C. Rollins

    Alison C. Rollins, born and raised in St. Louis city, is a 2019 National Endowment for the Arts Literature fellow. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in American Poetry Review, Iowa Review, New England Review, The New York Times Magazine, and elsewhere. A Cave Canem and Callaloo fellow, she is a 2016 recipient of the Poetry Foundation’s Ruth Lilly and Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Fellowship. In 2018, she was the recipient of a Rona Jaffe Writers' Award; and in 2020, the winner of a Pushcart Prize. She holds a Masters of Library and Information Science from the University of Illinois Urbana Champaign and has held faculty as well as librarian appointments at various institutions including the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Colorado College, and Pacific Northwest College of Art. Her debut poetry collection, Library of Small Catastrophes (Copper Canyon Press) was a 2020 Hurston/Wright Foundation Legacy Award nominee.

  • Cathryn Rose

    Cathryn Rose

    Cathryn Rose is a writer and editor from Texas. Her work has appeared in JoylandHobartTammy, and more. She lives in Providence, Rhode Island where she is an MFA student in fiction at Brown University. 

  • Sarah "Sam" Saitel

    Sarah "Sam" Saltiel

    Sarah "Sam" Saltiel is a queer nonbinary artist, writer, and ENnie-award winning game designer from New York City. They received a BA from the University of Chicago where they majored in English, Visual Arts, and Creative Writing. Her work generally deals with the body, its function as a permeable membrane between the individual and the institutions and social systems that shape their day-to-day life. She has publications in magazines such as Duende and Are We Europe, including two poetry chapbooks, a long exposure of undoing and a thesaurus for the way water returns and a tabletop roleplaying game, Passing. They're currently working on a mixed-form memoir about death anxiety as a personal, political, and philosophical phenomenon. 

  • My Tran

    My Tran

    My Tran is from Hanoi. They write about small things. Teeth, meat, and kinds of stains. Their prose was awarded the Chautauqua Janus Prize in 2019 and has appeared or is forthcoming in Black Warrior Review, Fairy Tale Review, and The Florida Review.

  • Falaks Vasa

    Falaks Vasa

    Falaks (they/she) is a goof and a fool, both in being and in practice. They seek, channel, and produce Joy for and with those (human, non-human and inbetweens) whose Joy has been systemically stolen. As an artist, writer, and educator, her practices move between performance, embroidery, video, fiction, poetry, collage, cooking, joking, birdwatching, 3D animation, and whatnots. Falaks has attended residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Maine and ACRE, Wisconsin; published a chapbook of poetry with the unnamed zine project; worked at the Brooklyn Children's Museum as an educator; and shown their artwork across spaces like Elastic Arts, Chicago, Queer Arts Festival, Vancouver, Amra Odbhuth, Kolkata, and BARTALK, The Hague. 

    Currently, Falaks seeks boundless, inexhaustible, lifelong fame~

  • Cassandra Vogel

  • Jackson Watson

    Jackson Watson

    Jackson Watson is a writer from Georgia. Their work swerves between embodiment and documents; some of it has been published in The Columbia Review. They like watching the falcons hatch.